FASHION TRENDS

SS/15 TRENDS

We recently attended the Trendview seminar hosted by KM Assoicates, where forecasters SCOUT, Oltmans van Nierkerk and Christine Boland gave their take on fashion, lifestyle and colour trends for spring/summer 2015.  Sarah Ridley, our communications manager, shares the findings.

Oltmans van Nierkerk colour and lifestyle presentation struck a chord and we could see how these trends would translate to environmental and brand design. Interestingly all three presentations touched on similar themes and palettes even though they had been pulled together independently and in different countries! They must be onto something.

1. Bland Future This trend is inspired by technology.  Taking flat, white, light surfaces and bringing them to life in unexpected ways.  To almost give a feeling of floating weightlessness.  It translates in tones of white fabrics embossed and crafted in unusual ways.  Texture is very important in this trend and minimal colour is used - maybe as a reflection or accent to this very bland palette.  We can see this being applied to environments to move minimal interiors on by using texture, and actually technology, to bring the space to life.  Think interesting use of fabrics to make interiors that might seem dull colour-wise a tactile experience.  Lighting could play an integral role in giving hints of colour but in a blurred way.


1. Bland Future

This trend is inspired by technology.  Taking flat, white, light surfaces and bringing them to life in unexpected ways.  To almost give a feeling of floating weightlessness.  It translates in tones of white fabrics embossed and crafted in unusual ways.  Texture is very important in this trend and minimal colour is used - maybe as a reflection or accent to this very bland palette. 

We can see this being applied to environments to move minimal interiors on by using texture, and actually technology, to bring the space to life.  Think interesting use of fabrics to make interiors that might seem dull colour-wise a tactile experience.  Lighting could play an integral role in giving hints of colour but in a blurred way.

2. True Blue Blue will be huge for summer ’15.  It’s a palette that will incorporate all strengths of blue from the light, waspish shades inspired by sky and seascape through to dark storm clouds and indigo.  Blues will be mixed together in fabric and outfits to give an interesting take on the trend.  Dying techniques, irregular pigments and unusual mixes of fabrics play their part especially for denim.  Neutral canvases are important too for the application of dye from all parts of the blue spectrum. The impact for interiors could lead to more denim type fabrics and blue shades being used for furniture covering, curtains and in unexpected places.  Not just for denim brands either.  While a riot of blue shades dominating an entire colour palette may be too much in some spaces, it could be used to good effect for zones or to accent areas.  A denim lampshade anyone?


2. True Blue

Blue will be huge for summer ’15.  It’s a palette that will incorporate all strengths of blue from the light, waspish shades inspired by sky and seascape through to dark storm clouds and indigo.  Blues will be mixed together in fabric and outfits to give an interesting take on the trend.  Dying techniques, irregular pigments and unusual mixes of fabrics play their part especially for denim.  Neutral canvases are important too for the application of dye from all parts of the blue spectrum. The impact for interiors could lead to more denim type fabrics and blue shades being used for furniture covering, curtains and in unexpected places.  Not just for denim brands either.  While a riot of blue shades dominating an entire colour palette may be too much in some spaces, it could be used to good effect for zones or to accent areas.  A denim lampshade anyone?

3. Spectral Red In contrast to a sea of blues, a striking and powerful spectrum of reds were shown as a palette.  This is ‘living life to the full’ reds that are vibrant and active.  These are high in pigment red tones that are quite Asian in style for their density of colour and application.  Softer shades of red were also used to create depth like in the use of translucent fabrics.  Rich neutral tones were shown to offset the saturated reds. Red is certainly a statement for an environment but used sparingly in a new and interesting colour combination could create inspiring new palettes for interiors.  For an arresting accent to highlight a piece of furniture, a cash desk or even a fitting room area.  Fast food restaurants this ain’t, but a stylish albeit dramatic statement.


3. Spectral Red

In contrast to a sea of blues, a striking and powerful spectrum of reds were shown as a palette.  This is ‘living life to the full’ reds that are vibrant and active.  These are high in pigment red tones that are quite Asian in style for their density of colour and application.  Softer shades of red were also used to create depth like in the use of translucent fabrics.  Rich neutral tones were shown to offset the saturated reds.

Red is certainly a statement for an environment but used sparingly in a new and interesting colour combination could create inspiring new palettes for interiors.  For an arresting accent to highlight a piece of furniture, a cash desk or even a fitting room area.  Fast food restaurants this ain’t, but a stylish albeit dramatic statement.

4. Colour Glitch This is a riot of accidental colours all mashed together. Bright and synthetic.  A sliver of black was used to accent but otherwise its optimistic and unashamed use of colour.  Rather like an experiment gone wrong but creates an interesting effect.  This could be put to good use in fabric design for the more outlandish.  There is nothing subtle in these colour combinations but they create unexpected partnerships to keep fresh and free. This trend certainly creates lots of opportunities for interiors and almost takes away colour boundaries and to an extent restrained good taste.  It’s not for those brands of a faint heart. Or ones where such a blast of colour doesn’t speak to their audience.  But for younger, hipper labels there are no rules.  It’s an explosion of unexpected colour.


4. Colour Glitch

This is a riot of accidental colours all mashed together. Bright and synthetic.  A sliver of black was used to accent but otherwise its optimistic and unashamed use of colour.  Rather like an experiment gone wrong but creates an interesting effect.  This could be put to good use in fabric design for the more outlandish.  There is nothing subtle in these colour combinations but they create unexpected partnerships to keep fresh and free.

This trend certainly creates lots of opportunities for interiors and almost takes away colour boundaries and to an extent restrained good taste.  It’s not for those brands of a faint heart. Or ones where such a blast of colour doesn’t speak to their audience.  But for younger, hipper labels there are no rules.  It’s an explosion of unexpected colour.

5. Green Hideaway This balances our new lifestyle and health aspirations, and brings back nature in our life.  Shades of green but in a modern palette.  Sage green is a key reference for this trend.  Influences are nature inspired by new growth, leaves, shoots and moss.  The palette travels from light to dark green.  It’s about an escape from city life to hide and be calm in an array of greens.  Interestingly there was no grey in any of the palettes for SS ’15. Greens are very interesting for interiors.  Aside from their calming effects they provide a backdrop which makes fashion and products really stand out.  It could even be used in an unexpected way –we’ve seen grass effects on restaurant floors but how about used in a soft interesting way in fitting rooms or shoe trying-on?  The colour palette can be used to give a bit of eco-chic or mixed with gold and neutrals for a more high-end spin.


5. Green Hideaway

This balances our new lifestyle and health aspirations, and brings back nature in our life.  Shades of green but in a modern palette.  Sage green is a key reference for this trend.  Influences are nature inspired by new growth, leaves, shoots and moss.  The palette travels from light to dark green.  It’s about an escape from city life to hide and be calm in an array of greens.  Interestingly there was no grey in any of the palettes for SS ’15.

Greens are very interesting for interiors.  Aside from their calming effects they provide a backdrop which makes fashion and products really stand out.  It could even be used in an unexpected way –we’ve seen grass effects on restaurant floors but how about used in a soft interesting way in fitting rooms or shoe trying-on?  The colour palette can be used to give a bit of eco-chic or mixed with gold and neutrals for a more high-end spin.

6. Foraging Resource Raw materials and natural colours influence this trend.  It’s about mixing purples with yellows and beiges - all from natural colours like straw, stone and aubergines.  The hippest restaurants forage for their tasting menus and this is now coming through in colour.  Being inspired by a colour found on a foraging trip and seeing how it could fit in with a palette.  It is also influenced by nature but more inspired by the landscape.  Mixing colours of chalks and clays with hints of green, blue, yellow found on the horizon. This trend really is how you imagine painting the colours of summer.  It would be great as an influence for seasonal interiors, windows and displays.  Aside from the landscape and foraging design cues for props, it gives a very usable palette that can be toned up or down depending on the style of your brand.  Bring a summer landscape to life indoors.


6. Foraging Resource

Raw materials and natural colours influence this trend.  It’s about mixing purples with yellows and beiges - all from natural colours like straw, stone and aubergines.  The hippest restaurants forage for their tasting menus and this is now coming through in colour.  Being inspired by a colour found on a foraging trip and seeing how it could fit in with a palette.  It is also influenced by nature but more inspired by the landscape.  Mixing colours of chalks and clays with hints of green, blue, yellow found on the horizon.

This trend really is how you imagine painting the colours of summer.  It would be great as an influence for seasonal interiors, windows and displays.  Aside from the landscape and foraging design cues for props, it gives a very usable palette that can be toned up or down depending on the style of your brand.  Bring a summer landscape to life indoors.